Friday, 25 May 2012

The Dialect Questionnaire: The Results Part 3

This is the final post on the Dialect Questionnaire Project conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Ryedale Folk Museum.

158 respondents completed the questionnaire.

Scroll down to see the words that no one selected…

Would you have used any of the following words?

If you haven’t drunk anything for a long time, you will be very...
No one selected: DROUGHTY or PADDOCKED

If you haven’t eaten any food for a long time, you will be very...
No one selected: CLAMMED OUT, PINED or WALLOW

What do you call something that you eat between meals?
No one selected: BAGGINGS, BITE OF TEN O'CLOCK, BITING-ON, MINNING-ON, CLOCKS, CROUST, DOWAN, FORENOON-DRINKINGS or PACKING

What do you say you’ve got when your head hurts?
No one selected: THE HEADACHE

What do you call a very small piece of wood that has got into your finger?
No one selected: SHIVE, SPLICE, SPOAL or STOB

What do you call any running water smaller than a river?
No one selected: SIKE


Scroll down to view the bar charts and see how many times each word was selected.

If you haven’t drunk anything for a long time, you will be very...




The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is THIRSTY

The second most popular word selected is DRY

Would you have chosen THIRSTY or DRY? Or, would you have chosen a different word?


What is left at the bottom of your teacup when you’ve finished drinking the tea?




The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is DREGS

The second most popular word selected is TEA-LEAVES

Would you have chosen DREGS or TEA-LEAVES? Or, would you have chosen a different word?


If you haven’t eaten any food for a long time, you will be very...




The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is HUNGRY

The second most popular word selected is FAMISHED

Would you have chosen HUNGRY or FAMISHED? Or, would you have chosen a different word?


What do you call something that you eat between meals?


The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is SNACK

The second most popular word selected is BIT OF A SNACK

Would you have chosen SNACK or BIT OF A SNACK? Or, would you have chosen a different word?


What do you say you’ve got when your head hurts?


The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is A HEADACHE

The second most popular word selected is A BAD HEAD

Would you have chosen A HEADACHE or A BAD HEAD? Or, would you have chosen a different word?


What do you call a very small piece of wood that has got into your finger?



The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is SPLINTER

The second most popular word selected is SPELL

Would you have chosen SPLINTER or SPELL? Or, would you have chosen a different word?



What do you call any running water smaller than a river?



The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is STREAM

The second most popular word selected is BECK

Would you have chosen STREAM or BECK? Or, would you have chosen a different word?


Which words did respondents choose to write in the 'other' category?

If you haven’t drunk anything for a long time, you will be very...
Respondents wrote: PARCHED, GAGGING, GAGGED, GASPING, GEGGING,
CLEM, FAIR CLEMMED and SPITTING FEATHERS

What is left at the bottom of your teacup when you’ve finished drinking the tea?
Respondents wrote: LEFT-OVERS

If you haven’t eaten any food for a long time, you will be very...
Respondents wrote: STARVING, STARVED, EMPTY, STARVIN, CLEMT, CLEMPT,
FAIR CLEMMED, HANK MARVIN, PECKISH and RAVENOUS

What do you call something that you eat between meals?
Respondents wrote: PIECE, BITE TO EAT, MUNCHES, A NIBBLE

What do you say you’ve got when your head hurts?
Respondents wrote: BANGING HEAD, MIGRAINE, A THUMPER, HEAD HURTS, HEAD FILL,
HEEDS BURSTIN, HIED'S THUMPING, NED HURTS, THUMPING HEAD AND YEDWARCH

What do you call a very small piece of wood that has got into your finger?
Respondents wrote: BLINTER, SLIVER, and SPELT

What do you call any running water smaller than a river?
Respondents wrote: DYKE, DITCH, OKSE and RILL

Here's some information that you might find interesting about some of the words you chose to write in the 'other' category… 


PIECE was first recorded in 1619. It is most frequently associated with Scottish, Irish, and regional North English.

SLIVER originated from the verb "to slive" meaning "to split". It is most frequently associated with the region of Suffolk.

SPELT is thought to have originated from the verb "to spelt" which means "to split".
It is most frequently associated with Lincolnshire and Northamptonshire.

RILL was first recorded in 1552. It's origin is uncertain but it is perhaps related to words in Dutch or German.


References for the above information:
Oxford English Dictionary. 2012. Oxford University Press. Available from: http://www.oed.com/
Wright, Joseph. The English Dialect Dictionary. 1898-1905. London: Frowde.

Thank you very much to all the respondents who completed the Dialect Questionnaire Project.
I hope you've all enjoyed reading the results! And, perhaps learnt a word or two along the way!

Special thanks to those who made this project possible:
Kevin Simms, David Stockdale and Emma Colclough at Ryedale Folk Museum and Dr. Fiona Douglas at the University of Leeds.


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